EVOL
EVOL
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Mad Men Season 7 (Part One) Premieres April 13th! Throw in some 30 Rock while you’re binge-watching Mad Men Season 6 on Netflix. 

Mad Men Season 7 (Part One) Premieres April 13th! Throw in some 30 Rock while you’re binge-watching Mad Men Season 6 on Netflix. 

Mad Men Season 7 (Part One) Premieres April 13th! Throw in some 30 Rock while you’re binge-watching Mad Men Season 6 on Netflix. 

Mad Men Season 7 (Part One) Premieres April 13th! Throw in some 30 Rock while you’re binge-watching Mad Men Season 6 on Netflix. 

Mad Men Season 7 (Part One) Premieres April 13th! Throw in some 30 Rock while you’re binge-watching Mad Men Season 6 on Netflix. 
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"At some point you just have to let go of what you thought should happen and live in what is happening."
Unknown (via stevenbong)
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finofilipino:

Los gatos mojados muestran su verdadera cara.
finofilipino:

Los gatos mojados muestran su verdadera cara.
finofilipino:

Los gatos mojados muestran su verdadera cara.
finofilipino:

Los gatos mojados muestran su verdadera cara.
finofilipino:

Los gatos mojados muestran su verdadera cara.
finofilipino:

Los gatos mojados muestran su verdadera cara.
finofilipino:

Los gatos mojados muestran su verdadera cara.
finofilipino:

Los gatos mojados muestran su verdadera cara.
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nevver:

Design Crush
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archiemcphee:

Losing an earring is much like losing a sock. Once you’ve lost one half of the pair, the abandoned mate is just about useless (unless you like to make sock puppets). If there is sentimental value attached to the remaining earring, it might be kept in a jewelry box, but there’s little chance it’ll dangle prettily from an earlobe ever again. Fortunately for earring-wearers in Manchester, England, architectural artists Lauren Sagar and Sharon Campbell found a splendid use for lonely orphaned earrings: they created The Chandelier of Lost Earrings.

“We wanted to gather together the lost and lonely earrings along with the stories of their owners into one beautiful sculpture,” the artists explained. The finished piece is displayed inside a glass house, which Sagar and Campbell created on the grounds of St. Mary’s Maternity Hospital in Manchester.

The magnificent chandelier is 8 feet (2.5 meters) long and was created using 3,500 orphan earrings, all of which were donated by people who had lost the other earring of the original pair.

"The earrings collected span several generations; women donating items from their grandmothers as well as their daughters. Many of the donated earrings were accompanied with personal stories and memories that have become a part of the legacy of the finished piece."

In addition to repurposed earrings, the chandelier is comprised of hundreds of lengths of chain, necklaces, bracelets, beads, broaches and two watches.
Photos by Helen Kitchen of Lime Arts, Manchester.
[via Neatorama and Arts Council England]
archiemcphee:

Losing an earring is much like losing a sock. Once you’ve lost one half of the pair, the abandoned mate is just about useless (unless you like to make sock puppets). If there is sentimental value attached to the remaining earring, it might be kept in a jewelry box, but there’s little chance it’ll dangle prettily from an earlobe ever again. Fortunately for earring-wearers in Manchester, England, architectural artists Lauren Sagar and Sharon Campbell found a splendid use for lonely orphaned earrings: they created The Chandelier of Lost Earrings.

“We wanted to gather together the lost and lonely earrings along with the stories of their owners into one beautiful sculpture,” the artists explained. The finished piece is displayed inside a glass house, which Sagar and Campbell created on the grounds of St. Mary’s Maternity Hospital in Manchester.

The magnificent chandelier is 8 feet (2.5 meters) long and was created using 3,500 orphan earrings, all of which were donated by people who had lost the other earring of the original pair.

"The earrings collected span several generations; women donating items from their grandmothers as well as their daughters. Many of the donated earrings were accompanied with personal stories and memories that have become a part of the legacy of the finished piece."

In addition to repurposed earrings, the chandelier is comprised of hundreds of lengths of chain, necklaces, bracelets, beads, broaches and two watches.
Photos by Helen Kitchen of Lime Arts, Manchester.
[via Neatorama and Arts Council England]
archiemcphee:

Losing an earring is much like losing a sock. Once you’ve lost one half of the pair, the abandoned mate is just about useless (unless you like to make sock puppets). If there is sentimental value attached to the remaining earring, it might be kept in a jewelry box, but there’s little chance it’ll dangle prettily from an earlobe ever again. Fortunately for earring-wearers in Manchester, England, architectural artists Lauren Sagar and Sharon Campbell found a splendid use for lonely orphaned earrings: they created The Chandelier of Lost Earrings.

“We wanted to gather together the lost and lonely earrings along with the stories of their owners into one beautiful sculpture,” the artists explained. The finished piece is displayed inside a glass house, which Sagar and Campbell created on the grounds of St. Mary’s Maternity Hospital in Manchester.

The magnificent chandelier is 8 feet (2.5 meters) long and was created using 3,500 orphan earrings, all of which were donated by people who had lost the other earring of the original pair.

"The earrings collected span several generations; women donating items from their grandmothers as well as their daughters. Many of the donated earrings were accompanied with personal stories and memories that have become a part of the legacy of the finished piece."

In addition to repurposed earrings, the chandelier is comprised of hundreds of lengths of chain, necklaces, bracelets, beads, broaches and two watches.
Photos by Helen Kitchen of Lime Arts, Manchester.
[via Neatorama and Arts Council England]
archiemcphee:

Losing an earring is much like losing a sock. Once you’ve lost one half of the pair, the abandoned mate is just about useless (unless you like to make sock puppets). If there is sentimental value attached to the remaining earring, it might be kept in a jewelry box, but there’s little chance it’ll dangle prettily from an earlobe ever again. Fortunately for earring-wearers in Manchester, England, architectural artists Lauren Sagar and Sharon Campbell found a splendid use for lonely orphaned earrings: they created The Chandelier of Lost Earrings.

“We wanted to gather together the lost and lonely earrings along with the stories of their owners into one beautiful sculpture,” the artists explained. The finished piece is displayed inside a glass house, which Sagar and Campbell created on the grounds of St. Mary’s Maternity Hospital in Manchester.

The magnificent chandelier is 8 feet (2.5 meters) long and was created using 3,500 orphan earrings, all of which were donated by people who had lost the other earring of the original pair.

"The earrings collected span several generations; women donating items from their grandmothers as well as their daughters. Many of the donated earrings were accompanied with personal stories and memories that have become a part of the legacy of the finished piece."

In addition to repurposed earrings, the chandelier is comprised of hundreds of lengths of chain, necklaces, bracelets, beads, broaches and two watches.
Photos by Helen Kitchen of Lime Arts, Manchester.
[via Neatorama and Arts Council England]
archiemcphee:

Losing an earring is much like losing a sock. Once you’ve lost one half of the pair, the abandoned mate is just about useless (unless you like to make sock puppets). If there is sentimental value attached to the remaining earring, it might be kept in a jewelry box, but there’s little chance it’ll dangle prettily from an earlobe ever again. Fortunately for earring-wearers in Manchester, England, architectural artists Lauren Sagar and Sharon Campbell found a splendid use for lonely orphaned earrings: they created The Chandelier of Lost Earrings.

“We wanted to gather together the lost and lonely earrings along with the stories of their owners into one beautiful sculpture,” the artists explained. The finished piece is displayed inside a glass house, which Sagar and Campbell created on the grounds of St. Mary’s Maternity Hospital in Manchester.

The magnificent chandelier is 8 feet (2.5 meters) long and was created using 3,500 orphan earrings, all of which were donated by people who had lost the other earring of the original pair.

"The earrings collected span several generations; women donating items from their grandmothers as well as their daughters. Many of the donated earrings were accompanied with personal stories and memories that have become a part of the legacy of the finished piece."

In addition to repurposed earrings, the chandelier is comprised of hundreds of lengths of chain, necklaces, bracelets, beads, broaches and two watches.
Photos by Helen Kitchen of Lime Arts, Manchester.
[via Neatorama and Arts Council England]
archiemcphee:

Losing an earring is much like losing a sock. Once you’ve lost one half of the pair, the abandoned mate is just about useless (unless you like to make sock puppets). If there is sentimental value attached to the remaining earring, it might be kept in a jewelry box, but there’s little chance it’ll dangle prettily from an earlobe ever again. Fortunately for earring-wearers in Manchester, England, architectural artists Lauren Sagar and Sharon Campbell found a splendid use for lonely orphaned earrings: they created The Chandelier of Lost Earrings.

“We wanted to gather together the lost and lonely earrings along with the stories of their owners into one beautiful sculpture,” the artists explained. The finished piece is displayed inside a glass house, which Sagar and Campbell created on the grounds of St. Mary’s Maternity Hospital in Manchester.

The magnificent chandelier is 8 feet (2.5 meters) long and was created using 3,500 orphan earrings, all of which were donated by people who had lost the other earring of the original pair.

"The earrings collected span several generations; women donating items from their grandmothers as well as their daughters. Many of the donated earrings were accompanied with personal stories and memories that have become a part of the legacy of the finished piece."

In addition to repurposed earrings, the chandelier is comprised of hundreds of lengths of chain, necklaces, bracelets, beads, broaches and two watches.
Photos by Helen Kitchen of Lime Arts, Manchester.
[via Neatorama and Arts Council England]
archiemcphee:

Losing an earring is much like losing a sock. Once you’ve lost one half of the pair, the abandoned mate is just about useless (unless you like to make sock puppets). If there is sentimental value attached to the remaining earring, it might be kept in a jewelry box, but there’s little chance it’ll dangle prettily from an earlobe ever again. Fortunately for earring-wearers in Manchester, England, architectural artists Lauren Sagar and Sharon Campbell found a splendid use for lonely orphaned earrings: they created The Chandelier of Lost Earrings.

“We wanted to gather together the lost and lonely earrings along with the stories of their owners into one beautiful sculpture,” the artists explained. The finished piece is displayed inside a glass house, which Sagar and Campbell created on the grounds of St. Mary’s Maternity Hospital in Manchester.

The magnificent chandelier is 8 feet (2.5 meters) long and was created using 3,500 orphan earrings, all of which were donated by people who had lost the other earring of the original pair.

"The earrings collected span several generations; women donating items from their grandmothers as well as their daughters. Many of the donated earrings were accompanied with personal stories and memories that have become a part of the legacy of the finished piece."

In addition to repurposed earrings, the chandelier is comprised of hundreds of lengths of chain, necklaces, bracelets, beads, broaches and two watches.
Photos by Helen Kitchen of Lime Arts, Manchester.
[via Neatorama and Arts Council England]
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"Raise your words, not voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder."
Rumi (via sunst0ne)